Is it possible to bake a taller loaf?

SGgirl

Hi I am a newbie, only started baking two weeks ago.  Although a tad obsessive because I wanted to get it right.  Baked this today and although it seems fine, I feel that it could be a bit taller. Smelled lovely and am waiting to cut it open to see if I have the desired crumbs. Question: why did my dough spread sideway when input it in the oven?  Did I ovenproof it or was it due to my not shaping it properly?  Please help, as my family is a tad annoyed in getting so many bread in the house and some solid enough to be used as cricket bats.

 

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Replies

mirjambrady 2016 September 25

Hi, I had the same with my first loaf - but now I'm just putting the dough in a bread tin - it's not an authentic shape, but at least the dough can't escape sideways :-)!

Mirjam

SGgirl 2016 September 25

Hi Mirjam

 

i will certainly give it a go.  I need to build up some confidence before trying again.

II had another go and this time the result was worse than the load that I had posted.  It was so bad that I didn't even brother to post it.  So all in all, I am getting worse not improving.

I think I read somewhere that it could be that the over developed dough, over proofed or under proof.  It will be a process of elimination one by one. 

Thanks for your tip :-). Happy baking

 

 

[email protected] 2016 October 5

it seems to me as though your yeast is burning out before mixing. IE your sourdough yeast has peaked feeding and is now regurgitating, therefore losing energy. No energy no rise.

SGgirl 2016 October 11

Hi

that is probably the main culprit because by the time I try to shape the dough, I can't achieve a tension surface and the more I try, the whole dough seems to turn wetter and more runnier.  I thought that by adding a bit more flour it will right it but it just got worse and thus I tried to make a quick form and put the dough into a banneton.  Thinking that it might recover there.  I must add that my starter is very young and is unstable.  Had bought some starter and trying again.

thank you very much for your help and encouragement.

SGgirl 2016 October 11

Hi

that is probably the main culprit because by the time I try to shape the dough, I can't achieve a tension surface and the more I try, the whole dough seems to turn wetter and more runnier.  I thought that by adding a bit more flour it will right it but it just got worse and thus I tried to make a quick form and put the dough into a banneton.  Thinking that it might recover there.  I must add that my starter is very young and is unstable.  Had bought some starter and trying again.

thank you very much for your help and encouragement.

Staff 2016 October 1

Hi SGgirl,

Perhaps if you could tell us what your process was from start to finish (including temperatures & timing) and the ingredients used, this might help us all to troubleshoot any issues.

 

sourdough.com

Ryan 2016 October 1

Try a sightly drier dough if your hydration was 60% try 55. where did you secondary ferment after shaping? I do my second in the fridge overnight which helps it keep shape, some people also use bannetons to help maintain shape. It could also have to so with your initial oven temp and the steam

albuck99 2016 October 4

That's actually not a bad looking loaf.
I get a lot of 'spread' when making freeform loaves because I like a lot of hydration for a better crumb. Just returned to baking in Dutch oven tonight for a higher loaf. Same recipe: Sourdough levain plus white flour, 60% hydration. 15 mins covered at 240°C then 15 min uncovered at 220°C.
Results are a much higher, plumper bread.
Keep going - mistakes are there so we can learn and become great bread-makers.

SourdoughBaz 2016 October 9

Hey SGgirl,

A couple of things..

someone mentioned a baking stone - good call though it doesn't stop spread it'll make a better loaf.

sounds like your hydration, books will tell you exact measurements but the fact is that flours hydrate differently depending on all kinds of factors. Keep trying and eventually you'll get a feel for the dough you're looking for. Trial and error's the only real way to start producing quality breads and it's fun so don't let a bad loaf put you off! 

The older your mother gets the better your rise and the better the taste. Never bin it, just take a tablespoon of one gone wrong and start it again with this. An older mother will also give you a faster rise along a second rise (less spread) less of a hassle.

hit me up if you need to know anything else @Sourdough_Baz

SGgirl 2016 October 11

Hi 

I think my starter is very young and isn't robust enough.  I tried timing it and also by observation I.e. Finger test etc.  the problem is every time I try to shape it, they seems to gain extra moisture and thus very wet and sticky.  My dough seems happy rough but when soles to the last leg they seems to go dormant.  I use a baking stone as well as a Dutch oven.  Lately I found that if I use a baking parchment instead of semolina it stay put.  Am baking another loaf now and will try to post and upside then.

thsnk you and much appreciated

farinam's picture
farinam 2016 October 11

Hello SGgirl,

You never did get around to telling us the recipe that you are using and the method and timing of your dough preparation, development and proving.  Also an idea of the temperature that you are working at would be helpful.  From your description it does sound a lot like over proved dough but more detailed information would be helpful.

Good luck with your projects.

Farinam

SGgirl 2016 October 24

Hi all just wanted to say thank you very much for all your encouragement and advice.  I think I have mastered the technique and it all boils down to mainly two culprits, the starter and over proofing.  I woukd love to show you the loaf that I've baked but I am unable to load the photo.

happy baking and once again thank you for all your comments and encouragements

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