Help please.

ZacF81
Hi all, Its my first post here, so hi everyone. I started baking Sourdough loaves about 2 months ago and I had some really good successes using Allinson's strong white bread flour. However due to covid I can no longer get that and have switched to strong white flour from the local butcher. Recently tried 2 white Sourdough loaves and both have been unbelievably too wet. I never had this problem before and the only thing that has changed is the flour. Would I be right in assuming this flour can take much less water and is making my dough too hydrated? I gave it a good slap and fold and had a really nice ball to go into its bulk ferment. During this process it became wetter, and by the time shaping came it was a blob. Stuck it in a floured tea towel regardless, and it proved nicely in there. However it got stuck to the tes Towel and upon turning out it ripped and degassed. There was a lovely gluten structure inside however so I don't think collapsing gluten was the issue, more the hydration. Any help would be massively appreciated, as I had some real successes and these 2 failures have got me rather down about my baking. Thanks, Zac
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Bryan 2020 August 23

My process

I'm using aprox. 6 cups of unbleached flour. I start with 4 cups of water to 4 cups of flour and about 1 cup or so of starter. When it gets real frothy, which can take several houres depending on the ambient temp. here in the PNW. I then start adding more flour and small amounts of water until it's almost impossible to stire. It's still pretty sticky when I roll it out on a floured counter. I dust the dough with flour and start the kneeding. I keep dusting with flour enough to keep the dough from sticking to my hands. I kneed the dough for about 5 to10 min.only adding enough flour to keep it from sticking to the counter and my hands.  I cut the dough in half,and put each in large bowls to rise. When they've doubled in size I punch them down and put them in large bread pans that I made to rise again before baking. I've been doing it this way for about 6 years now with good results.

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