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I attempt my first starter, i began with 1 cup roganic unbleached flour and 1 cup of warm water. The next day i removed i cup and put half cup flour and half cup water back in.
Now the problem i found is that it wasnt reacting at all it remained like batter.

Im think, and this is my question , by removing 1 cup am i really removing half or more than half, should i weight the starter and them remove half, what i was finding is that when i removed a cup there was very little starter left in the jar

Hope this makes sense

Craig

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SourGeek 2006 February 9

[quote="Craig"]
Now the problem i found is that it wasnt reacting at all it remained like batter.
. . . by removing 1 cup am i really removing half or more than half, . . .
[/quote]
Several points:

You don't need to use that much if you don't want to.
Usually the starter won't start bubbling significantly until about a week after you start it.
And yes, the total volume from a cup of each will be less than two cups. You can take out less at first, then later, taking more will be better.

Bill44's picture
Bill44 2006 February 9

Craig, don't know where you are but I'm on the Central Coast NSW Australia.

My first two starters were all started in a large glass jar on 32 -34 degree days, within 6-7 hours they were frothing all over the place and they were junk, threw them away.

My succesful starter that I am using now I started on a 27 degree day, 1 cup water (only just warm), 1 1/2 cups unbleached bakers flour, mixed together with an electric beater. Placed in a wide mouthed mixing bowl near an open window (With a fly screen on it).

By the end of the first day I think I had one small bubble, stirred gently and left it out overnight. By the next day there was a reasonable amount of activity so that night I mixed one cup of brew and one cup of just warm water and 1 1/2 cups of flour and mate, the rest is history

northwestsourdough's picture
northwestsourdough 2006 February 11

I think you just have to keep trying until you catch a great sourdough yeast. I have tried several times in my life, but nothing compares to the one I found last Summer. I read the La Brea Bakery book by Nancy Silverton and I followed her directions for feeding and caring for a new starter to get it going really well. I think newbies often just forget to feed their sourdough starter enough and it just dies or starts to smell rotten.
So they give up too soon. Good luck,
Teresa
www.northwestsourdough.com

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