Testing internal temperature

Scarsdale's picture
Scarsdale

Is it helpful or necessary to test the internal temperature of a sourdough loaf with a thermometer to assist in determining if it is cooked?  I have read that 100 degrees C is ideal but cant seem to get my (approx) 500g loaves over 80 degrees C internally before they start looking over-cooked/browned.

Any thoughts would be welcome.

Scarsdale

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Millciti's picture
Millciti 2009 June 7

Anywhere from 88-100 is good.  I really don't have any problems getting to that temp in less time than most recipes state.  Two things might be a problem, your thermometer might be off or your oven.  What type of thermometer are you using?  Anything different about your oven?

You might not be heating your oven enough before you bake.  Are you using a stone?

 

Terri


 

Scarsdale's picture
Scarsdale 2009 June 7

Thanks Terri, grateful for your thoughts.  I am using a standard kitchen type thermometer, it might be worth upgrading it!  I am using a large, new gas oven & still experimenting with the using the fan force or not.  Any thoughts on using the oven fan? 

I preheat for 1/2 an hour, any longer than this just seems such a waste of gas.  Yes, I am using unglazed terracotta tiles for baking on.


 

sdevo 2009 June 7
Using a Probe thermometer is a risk free way of telling if your bread is done. In my early attempts at bread making i just followed the recipe times and temperatures. Some loaves looked cooked and were soft and too moist in the middle while some were too dry and over cooked. Its hard to tell just by looking at them and tapping the crust. If your are always changing the size and shape of the loafs it is hard to get it right. Now, two points. I use a large fan forced/non fan forced (conventional) electric oven. The oven temperature on fan forced ventilation is always 20-30 degrees C higher than on the dial. Conventional oven seems to be right. So go and buy a oven thermometer. They are relatively cheap at $10-20. A good investment.Next, get a probe thermometer. I had an old analog dial type that i used with a Weber BBQ. Not really up to bread making. I purchased a digital probe thermometer for around $30 and works perfectly giving me maximum and minimus temperatures. There are more expensive ones, but home kitchen standard is fine.Result is no more loaves wasted or just used for toasting or chook food.
Panevino 2009 June 7
Hi Scarsdale, here's my 2 cents worth - The type of bread and proof level of the loaf might also be playing a role: a laof with a tighter crumb or an underproofed loaf may lengthen the amount of time for the heat to reach the center of the bread. Cheers, Tony.
Millciti's picture
Millciti 2009 June 7

I have heard that the newer fan ovens can be a problem...especially if you don't have the option to turn off the fan.  Sounds good that you have both options.  Sometimes when you need some extra browning that feature may come in handy.  The oven thermometer and a new digital probe are both a good idea.  If you have the option to turn off the fan it will definitly help on breads where you are trying to create steam.  And Tony is right hydration, proving times, and the even the type of flours also affect browning.  

Best Regards,

Terri


 

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