Gluten Free Sourdough

HopesHope

There is a post somewhere here on the forum where a woman was asking for a gluten free sourdough recipe.   Well I was online tonight looking for info on Sourdough and came across one.   Here it is for you and I will post the website as well.   I just hope the person who was looking for a recipe sees this post.  

 

 

Sourdough Starter, Gluten-Free

Equipment Needed
-large glass, plastic, or pottery container–like a bowl, a jar, or a measuring cup–be sure it can hold about 6 C of dough
-something porous to cover the container with like cheesecloth or parchment paper that is poked full of holes (don’t use aluminum foil)

Ingredients
-Sorghum Flour plus some others: any or all of: Brown Rice flour, Amaranth flour, Garbanzo Bean flour
-Water (we have filtered water in our house that contains no chorine–and I think that does the best)
-Organic red cabbage leaves (although I heard that people have had good results w/non-organic as well)

Method
Place 1 C (5 oz) of sorghum flour and 1 C (8 oz/250 ml) of water in your container. Mix thoroughly (I’ve been using a whisk and it’s worked well). Add 1 or 2 leaves of red cabbage. Mix those around with the flour-water slurry.

Cover with your porous material. You can also leave it open if you don’t have fruit flies bopping around your kitchen like I do–leaving it open will encourage more wild yeast from your kitchen to land on the mixture. Leave it on your kitchen counter.

Stir it every so often–no stress, just when you think about it. About 12 hours later, add another 1 C each of sorghum flour and water. Mix well.

Repeat this process every 12-ish hours. After about 48 hours you should see some bubbling action in your starter.  Once the bubbling action is definitely in place (wait another full day), then you can remove the cabbage leaves. 

Congratulations!  Your starter is on its way.  Now you need to feed it every 12 hours or so.  Play around with the flours you feed it with–I’ve been alternating sorghum, brown rice, amaranth, and garbanzo bean flours.  You can see and smell how each of these affects your starter.

 

 

Here's the link to the website.... 

http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2010/10/sourdough-starter-gluten-free/

 

take care!

 

Hope

 

 

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Replies

overboots 2011 January 11

Whilst this great web site is not about public health there is at times entries that verge on pseudo science. There seems to be a number of members that think that "spring" water and chlorine free water are superior to treated water coming through your tap.

The fact is that the provision of potable water is considered one of the great advances in public health (along with the removal and treatment of sewerage). If the smell of chlorine worries you just let the water stand for a while and the chlorine will dissipate. In the meantime have a think about what your "spring" water might have filtered through on the way to the bottling plant and how much people in third water countries would love to have the provision of your dreaded tap water.

Cheers

Colin

Polo 2011 January 12

...........that the reference to using filtered, unchlorinated water in the recipe is more for the benefit of the starter and not due to health concerns. I've read that starters can have a difficult time getting "started" using chemically treated (chlorinated) water.

I also do not think that anyone here would advocate using sewage laced or otherwise tainted water for human ingestion, they are just trying to give the little yeasties a fair chance to get a foothold in thier new environment.

Polo

 

[quote=overboots]

Whilst this great web site is not about public health there is at times entries that verge on pseudo science. There seems to be a number of members that think that "spring" water and chlorine free water are superior to treated water coming through your tap.

The fact is that the provision of potable water is considered one of the great advances in public health (along with the removal and treatment of sewerage). If the smell of chlorine worries you just let the water stand for a while and the chlorine will dissipate. In the meantime have a think about what your "spring" water might have filtered through on the way to the bottling plant and how much people in third water countries would love to have the provision of your dreaded tap water.

Cheers

Colin

[/quote]

HopesHope 2011 January 11

I'm not concerned about water.  I use tap.  If you would read the first paragraph of my initial post, I said there was someone here who posted [and I cannot find it] inquiring about gluten free starter.   Soooo,  in my search for other things related to sourdough I found this sight.  

 

Everyone has an opinion about what kind of water and flour and measurements should be used, and they are entitled to have and share that opinion.    I always say be creative and figure it out for your self  in your own kitchen, while keeping a journal of successes and mistakes.  

mygoodness 2011 January 12

Hope,

Thanks so much for remembering my quest for a sourdough starter! I had found one for a brown rice starter thanks to another kind poster on this site.

I really like the sound of red cabbage leaves to get things going though. Even I can understand this!

Will let you know how things go.

Cheers

Imogen

HopesHope 2011 January 12

You are very welcome!  

 

did you start a starter using brown rice, if so, let me know how that goes also.   I'm interested...   and yes I would like to know how the starter goes from the link..

 

Take care

 

Hope

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