Uh-oh, I don't think this was the idea...

Jake

I tried to make a rustic looking, unslashed loaf with a 'natural grigne.' However, this was the result. I definitely got the 'volcanic look,' as you so aptly describe it Jeremy (although 'giant crater look' might me a better description).

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/7871-2/IMG_1875.JPG[/img]

Basically, it rolled open the opposite way that I had shapen it. Kind of logical I suppose. What'd I do wrong?? I let it prove seamside down before placing it seamside up in the oven.

Jake

Category: 
up
62 users have voted.

Replies

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 2

G'day Jake,

I know this isn't strictly what you're trying to achieve but I thought I'd post it anyway as it's an example of free form cracking without cutting or docking. Contains 80% rye flour; final proof was in a basket with the seam down and placed on the peel and oven sole seam down. However, one influencing factor which you might consider to apply an appropriate but specific technique is the flour type you are using.

[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_1715.jpg[/img]

[b]EDIT:[/b] perhaps I should have included, these are not home made considering this section is called [b]"Home Sourdough"[/b]. Made them at work.

Here's the formula and I've added weight values for two loaves @ 1.050 wt. BTW this weight is suited for the small baskets. However if you only have the big baskets then use 1.300 per unit weight.

[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2893-1.jpg[/img]

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 2

Well Danubian,
Nice work! U have to share that formula!
I am working on interesting walnut leek and rye loaf right now myself, will post if it works!

Jeremy

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 2

G'day Jeremy,

Formula? No problem. Can I attach a word document here?

Ok, rye walnut and leek, good luck and post the results.

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 5

Dear Danubian,

Sure, I'm not one of your well doing apprentices. Mostly because of my lack of obedience. But I do my best to follow your advice. This time I used my right hand like you've told me. There was only a very small hurting of the surface... but it worked out beautiful and only showed the strength of the pressure inside...

This time I wanted still more rye: 90%. And there is an abundance of semolina in my kitchen. So I used this for "hard wheat", the word "durum" suggests something hard some how

Well I've learned from Carla who grinds her durum grain by herself, that durum needs time, much time an water to build crumb. So I wasted no thought of putting dry semolina in my final dough, no, I gave it completely to my sourdough, fed the starter with a calculated mix... rye and semolina. This is only for the crumb and the beauty of the possible colour.

Now proudly presenting in oversize (cutting not before the following 48 hours... )

[img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8649-2/90+10.jpg[/img]

Skua

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 July 5

[quote="Skua"]
This time I wanted still more rye: 90%. And there is an abundance of semolina in my kitchen. So I used this for "hard wheat", the word "durum" suggests something hard some how

Well I've learned from Carla who grinds her durum grain by herself, that durum needs time, much time an water to build crumb. So I wasted no thought of putting dry semolina in my final dough, no, I gave it completely to my sourdough, fed the starter with a calculated mix... rye and semolina. This is only for the crumb and the beauty of the possible colour.

Now proudly presenting in oversize (cutting not before the following 48 hours... )

[img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8649-2/90+10.jpg[/img]
[/quote]

Well done, Michael. You've really made progress, the volume appears excellent and you've definitely got the cracking you were looking for. I'd be interested to see the internal structure. When you deem it ready for cutting please take a picture?

You've done the right thing by allowing the semolina to soak as long as possible. BTW it appears you've got the finished dough temperature (FDT) spot on. It shows by the fact that your loaf has a finer network of truly random cracking, well done!

BTW Conversely, when the FDT is too cool - usually due to refrigerated sourdough - the cracking does not spread evenly on the whole surface and tends to be very deep, and unattractive indeed. If, for what ever reason the FDT is too cool then longer bulk fermentation will help to offset this and enable a better result. But for the best results correct temperatures are imperative.

Jake 2007 June 4

Wow!! Those are impressive-looking breads Danubian! That's the kind of thing I envisioned my oven producing. How did you do it?? Am looking forward to seeing your formula...

(I don't know if you can attach a Word document - but you could always copy and paste into the text box)

Jake

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 5

Jake & Jeremy,

I decided to photograph the formula page to keep the formatting intact, you'll find it in my original post under the picture of the bread.

As I mentioned before these were made in a bakery so you'll have to play around with the methods and time frames to adapt them to a home kitchen.

good luck.

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 7

Thank you, Danubian!

I owe you something! Here are the crumb shots!

[img]http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u40/Eisflieger/crumb90.jpg[/img]

[img]http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u40/Eisflieger/rye.jpg[/img]

Skua

doughman 2007 June 5

Hi Danubian,

Nice bread! For the rye sourdough preparation, are you using the Weinheimer One-Phase method?

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 7

Something about the flours. And a personal view concerning the taste.

The challenging thing in making rye for the beginner is: don't loose shape! Make it strong! Go beyond the final frontier, try a higher percentage, to boldly go where no loaf has gone before

So this time I used the lightest rye available without driving to the next mill. Rye type 997. That means: half of the outer shell of the grain is removed and meant to feed the cattle. Hey we all are healthy, it is not that what I wanted to ask...

It is the taste. My first try with the vulcanic look I used whole rye, with a soaker grinded by my self. The baking of such a dough produces clouds of overwhelming scent. Without exaggeration! And the taste is outstanding. This was the crumb of my 80 %

[img]http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u40/Eisflieger/crumb80.jpg[/img]

Not really even, but I loved its colour and its taste. Now to the new thing, you see a post above, 90%, wow... It looks more civilized, I admit that. But the taste on my tongue is not better, a bit dryness, the colour in my eyes is "nice" but...

Well I think the real challenge is to find out the most tasty mixture. Maybe its only 30% rye but whole rye. Percentages as numbers doesn' t matter. My target is: to find the taste I'm missing since years. What mixture could that be? Or do I have to change it always up and down? No idea

Skua

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 July 7

Hey Doc!
Those look good whatever percentage, though I am converted to the all rye loaves no matter how awful my versions are! Today I am making a Tiroler Landbrot from Dieter's site!
Will post and give some descriptions later, maybe make a post on my site, going where no baker in the US has gone before!

Jeremy

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 5

[quote="Doughman"]
Hi Danubian,

Nice bread! For the rye sourdough preparation, are you using the Weinheimer One-Phase method?
[/quote]

G'day Doughman,

No, I've played around with the [b]Detmold single phase[/b] and produced this sourdough formula. I varied it to suit the type of rye flour we use here. Our rye tends to be deficient in diastase activity so the starter % to flour is higher at 28'C. Normally the starter should be 2% to the flour at 28'C but I find 5% does produce the required pH and TA. Of course it's varied again with a higher extraction rate rye flour. The other parameter I've varied is the DY at 170 instead 180 which is standard with the Detmold single phase.

In the past I was very keen on the [b]Classic 3 Stage Full sour Overnight[/b] but it's too labour intensive and demands extra commitment which I'm not willing to give at this point, especially since my varied Detmold single produces very good results.

Thanks TP nice of you to say so.

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 8

[quote="Jeremy"] ...Tiroler Landbrot... going where no baker in the US has gone before! ....Jeremy[/quote]

A loaf! I wonder if you ever visited Tirol, this new loaf on your side doesn't look like a boulder from Tirol to me.

Perhaps from Iceland, or Greenland a long time ago?

The first baker in the US going very far was.. I think it was a viking, the chef on board, in the ship of Leif Ericcson. He did the first step onto a new world. As the most important member of the first landing party he had a mission. To feed his hungry homesick crew. He built a primitive oven, and he created a loaf that reminded the men of the volcanic surface of the land they came from.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 July 9

You know doctor Spock!
Yeah haven't been to the Tirol yet! Alps yes, anyway I don't understand it the recipe was quite easy to comprehend, though I googled Tirolean landbrot and the thing was filled with holes like it was docked rather than slashed? Don't know but it tasted good, a deep taste, check it out on my site if you like!

Jeremy

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 5

Thanks Danubian,
Will give it a try, what is DY? I made that leek walnut loaf and it tastes great but the ratio of barley flour made me use a too weak wheat flour (all purpose) so next time I will try adding bread flour instead, no pics, not worthy!
This is the thread on the site I joined in Germany!
http://www.backrezepte-online.de/forum/ ... php?t=1125

Jeremy
P.S. What is the final proofing time?

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 July 10

[quote="Skua"]Something about the flours. And a personal view concerning the taste.

The challenging thing in making rye for the beginner is: don't loose shape! Make it strong! Go beyond the final frontier, try a higher percentage, to boldly go where no loaf has gone before

So this time I used the lightest rye available without driving to the next mill. Rye type 997. That means: half of the outer shell of the grain is removed and meant to feed the cattle. Hey we all are healthy, it is not that what I wanted to ask...

It is the taste. My first try with the vulcanic look I used whole rye, with a soaker grinded by my self. The baking of such a dough produces clouds of overwhelming scent. Without exaggeration! And the taste is outstanding. This was the crumb of my 80 %

Not really even, but I loved its colour and its taste. Now to the new thing, you see a post above, 90%, wow... It looks more civilized, I admit that. But the taste on my tongue is not better, a bit dryness, the colour in my eyes is "nice" but...

Well I think the real challenge is to find out the most tasty mixture. Maybe its only 30% rye but whole rye. Percentages as numbers doesn' t matter. My target is: to find the taste I'm missing since years. What mixture could that be? Or do I have to change it always up and down? No idea
[/quote]

Michael, thanks for those pictures of the bread crumb, they look just fine in my opinion. I say that not on the basis of the crumb colour, but from a structural point of view. I believe you're correct, generally speaking, a very low extraction rate rye bread hasn't the same aromatic character as one with a higher extraction. Now you have to combine the good external characteristics with the aroma and flavour of the first.

I mentioned before that I make this bread from a higher extraction flour also and it has a better aromatic and flavour profile than the lighter bread, but the lighter is also acceptable - it's different!

I hope you keep notes of all you make so you are able to repeat the best results. I keep everything recorded; hey, I even keep a fishing diary!!

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 5

G'day Jeremy,

Dough Yield (DY) refers to the hydration rate; eg DY 170 means water at 70% etc.

"Final proof" refers to that period of time from final moulding (shaping) until the dough enters the oven. Finished dough temperature (FDT) has a profound influence on bulk fermentation times as well as final proof times. Prover temperature is also very influencial on final proof times.

It pays to use good strong wheat flour when blending with other grain flours or when adding large percentages of ingredients - leek and walnuts - that add weight on the gluten structure of the dough.

Thanks for the link I'll check it out.

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 10

[quote="Danubian"]...
I hope you keep notes of all you make so you are able to repeat the best results. I keep everything recorded; hey, I even keep a fishing diary!![/quote]
Oh yes, of course. It is just like offshore fishing ... At first I listen to the meteorological forecast, then I check my handbooks, mostly using several sources, calculate my coordinates, check the equipment, request for the allowance to leave...

and I always keep my log book! Odd, my notes are kept in English the last days... perhaps I'm loosing my orientation in German home baking ...

[img]http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u40/Eisflieger/aufzeichnungenweb-1.jpg[/img]

By the going off topic: sure you've some amazing pics of your fishing adventures? Are you a reefer at the north coast?

Skua

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 6

Today I tried this volcanic look. Hey that's cool to watch the crackling in the hot oven!

[img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8273-4/Roggen.jpg[/img]

I used your Formula, Danubian.

Only with little adaptions. No malt allowed, no malt given! German rye has a fierce enzymatic loading! And no hard wheat available, sorry. The hardest I could find was an Italian style flour. 9.5% in protein. Hey, we never have something better! Weak sun I assume

So it is up to the gently kneaded pentosanes to make bread inside. I hope so! My sourdough is a 3 stage. Pöt's system. Easy to use for homebakers!

Michael

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 July 11

[quote="Skua"]By the going off topic: sure you've some amazing pics of your fishing adventures? Are you a reefer at the north coast?[/quote]

I prefer to fish rivers, have a look [url=http://s22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/?action=view&current=marapool.jpg][b]here[/b][/url]

This is what I found in the water [url=http://s22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/?action=view&current=CRW_2363.jpg][b]here[/b][/url]

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 6

[quote="Skua"]
Today I tried this volcanic look. Hey that's cool to watch the crackling in the hot oven!

[img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8273-4/Roggen.jpg[/img]

I used your Formula, Danubian.

Only with little adaptions. No malt allowed, no malt given! German rye has a fierce enzymatic loading! And no hard wheat available, sorry. The hardest I could find was an Italian style flour. 9.5% in protein. Hey, we never have something better! Weak sun I assume

So it is up to the gently kneaded pentosanes to make bread inside. I hope so! My sourdough is a 3 stage. Pöt's system. Easy to use for homebakers!
[/quote]

G'day Michael,

If I may, just a helping hand to improve the cracking appearance of your rye.

Firstly, it appears the final proof of your dough piece was seam "up" and placed in the oven seam "down"?

If my observation is correct you have missed out on getting the best and most evenly distributed cracking during proving. If you try placing the seam [b]"down" [/b]in the well dusted basket - this dough should be a little on the soft side. Then liberally dust the[b] top [/b]of the loaf and smooth it down - so there is a fine coating of flour - by running your hand right around and over it, like rubbing the top of a ball. Then allow to prove. During this time the dough piece will develop cracks all over the top surface because the dough is unable to stretch freely due to the lack of insoluble elastic protein. As proving continues the cracks will widen and become more wide spread. When it's time for baking, place your hand on the top of the dough piece carefully and up turn your basket. Then gently roll over onto the dusted peel with the seam [b]"down" [/b]. Finally, the limited expansion that will occur in the oven will continue in the existing cracks, and the colour contrast will result as the rich brown of the exposed dough caramelises.

I understand your need to stay away from diastase enzymes - malt - when using European Rye. I'm surprised Canadian flour isn't available in Germany.

Yes, pentosans are very important in rye bread doughs.

For those inexperienced with rye; the water content of rye bread doughs is very important and most inexperienced bakers tend to make rye doughs too tight due to the pentosans, soluble fibres, and gums which give a sticky nature to the dough.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 July 11

My brother does that in Colorado! Catches salmon when he goes to the wilds of Oregon!

Jeremy

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 6

Very well! Thank you Danubian for the very clear description! I will try this! It is always very confusing for me this seam side up and down under. But now here is the lost key...

[quote="Danubian"]
... it appears the final proof of your dough piece was seam "up" and placed in the oven seam "down" ?...
[/quote]

Not exactly. The final proof was counter intuitive with the seam side in the bottom of the basket. There it grew together in the following 2 hours. But then I did it wrong. I turned the loaf with the key up. I thought this was the idea ... an opening of the weak seam side. Wasn' it?

Anyway I will never dock or score these high percentage ryes again! Beautiful!

For the flours...
Perhaps it has something to do with subsidies, import duties and politics. In Europe only the british bakers are free to choose Canadian flour, I think. Even at the [i]Coupe du Monde de la Boulangerie[/i] in Paris the American bakers looked a bit surprised at the offered flours.

Michael

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 July 11

[quote="Jeremy"]My brother does that in Colorado! Catches salmon when he goes to the wilds of Oregon!
[/quote]

Perhaps you could have some brotherly bonding time .... in Oregon?!

I'd love to fish some of those beautiful rivers in Oregon.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 July 12

I already bonded on a river in Colorado on slippery rocks and frigid water! As well rode to 10,000 feet into the mountains and back down in a violent storm with hail and lightining! That was bonding!
My brother went to the most remote and natural park called Niha (spell check) ate bluberry pie with a crust made from bear fat! That park was where the Nez Perce where from, he said it's awesome, real nature raw!

Jeremy

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 July 12

Salmons and bears…

You both live on the other side of another planet, definitely. Salmons and mussels was the everyday dish for my Rhineland ancestors 100 years ago. And we shot the last bear 200 years ago. Well, we are setting out thousands of salmons in the Rhine everywhere, every year. They should conquer their old origins again…Guess this is politics to calm us brave citizens. In fact it seems to be hard for them to go upstream, maybe they become a bit too heavy with all the cadmium and lead inside their bellies. And the cooling systems of our nukes keep the river warm and therefore short of oxygen, especially in summer.

The heraldic animal of my city - K-town - is a trout. As I was a boy I tried to catch wild ones in a small stream with my hand. Today they are all save from children. We keep them in farms to remember our history.

Skua

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 7

Danubian!
It worked, although I used white rye flour(finer milled!) in the final dough instead of whole grain, worked stupendously although I think in a pro oven it would look somewhat nicer!
[img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8284-1/CIMG1854.JPG[/img]

Thanks!
Jeremy
P.S. Where are you located?

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 7

Well done Jeremy. I'm in Sydney.

I made a few loaves today for the weekend fishing trip up to the mountains. However, since I was going to be making some bread I decided to photograph the proving and loading onto peel in sequence.

Below, dough just after moulding in the basket with the seam down
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2915.jpg[/img]

At full proof ready to be transfered on to the peel
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2933.jpg[/img]

Hand on top about to turn the basket over
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2936.jpg[/img]

Being released from the basket
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2938.jpg[/img]

Rolled over seam on the peel ready for the oven.
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2939.jpg[/img]

And here's the long long one
[img]http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b317/plutrach/IMG_2942.jpg[/img]

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 8

Danubian,
Very cool, although I didn't let my bread proof as much in fear of having a pancake instead of a beautiful loaf! Do you use a light rye or whole grain rye? As well I wanted to know what is the hydration of your mother starter and is it rye or wheat?
You looking for any bakers?

Jeremy

doughman 2007 June 8

Hi Danubian,

So, when the dough is baking on the hearth, the seam side is down? It sure develops into a very nice random cracks on the top crust. So, the basket is
never covered in plastic? Have you ever tried to bake the bread with the seam
side up? Instead of using regular bread flour with that formula, you might want to
try using type 1050 flour instead.

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 8

[quote="Jeremy"]
Danubian,
Very cool, although I didn't let my bread proof as much in fear of having a pancake instead of a beautiful loaf! Do you use a light rye or whole grain rye? As well I wanted to know what is the hydration of your mother starter and is it rye or wheat?
You looking for any bakers?
[/quote]

The amount of proof is difficult to gage and experience is the best teacher. I've made plenty of pancakes too!
That was finely sieved rye flour with a relatively low extraction, has a nice colour, although I make this bread with different types also. I think it looks and eats best made with a medium type rye; I can't remember the German "type no." equivalent, perhaps T 850 or as Doughman suggests T 1050.

[u][b]Starter[/b][/u]? The reason the [b]starter[/b] weight isn't used in the calculation is because it's used to start the [b][u]next batch[/u][/b] of sourdough!
I suppose we have different uses for the word [b]starter[/b], as far as I can tell, in American parlance [b]'starter'[/b] is what Germans call [b]'sourdough'[/b] however the Germans use the word 'starter' to mean the [b]mature sourdough[/b] that's added to flour and water to "start" the fermentation in a new sourdough. Essentially it's the same thing but it's called starter when it's used to 'start' the next batch. When the same is used for bread doughs, it’s called 'sourdough'. In summary, my ‘starter’ and or ‘mother’ or ‘chef’ is the mature sourdough.

Not looking for bakers, sorry.

[quote="Doughman"]
So, when the dough is baking on the hearth, the seam side is down? It sure develops into a very nice random cracks on the top crust. So, the basket is
never covered in plastic? Have you ever tried to bake the bread with the seam
side up? Instead of using regular bread flour with that formula, you might want to
try using type 1050 flour instead.
[/quote]

Yep, seam side down, and I never cover the basket, covering, seems to minimise crack distribution and tends to reabsorb the dust resulting in less contrast. Yes, I have made it seam side up, but I've never been able to achieve good symmetry and pleasing – random - crack distribution. I think you’re right; slightly higher extraction flour produces even better eating.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 8

[quote]
That was finely sieved rye flour with a relatively low extraction, has a nice colour, although I make this bread with different types also. I think it looks and eats best made with a medium type rye; I can't remember the German "type no." equivalent, perhaps T 850 or as Doughman suggests T 1050.
[/quote]

I used a whole grain levain or sauer or starter? (bread baking has so many terms!
In the dough I used some whole grain rye and the majority light rye as I didn't have any medium, rye sadly is not a popular flour or bread here in America, one of my key contentious issue and persistent [email protected] with bread baker on my blog!
The bread tastes great though somewhat gummy or still a bit sticky in texture, had it with some smoked salmon last night and chopped chicken liver (a Jewish speciality!), when I get a shipment of flour from King Arthur flour I will order some medium rye!
They remind me of a bread I saw in a book from Switzerlands Richemont school.

Jeremy

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 8

In my country only rye sourdough qualifies as sourdough...

The official term for a rye starter is "Sauerteig".
The official term for a starter fed with wheat, spelt, barley, oats or anything else is "Sauer"

If you feed your starter only with one kind of grain it develops its very own characteristic flavour. It needs some cycles of feeding for that. This is the reason it could be worthy to "guide" a sourdough (rye) and a levain (wheat).

So I use a rye starter for my everyday mixed flour bread and a wheat starter for my luxury Sunday bread.

Here they are... [img]http://sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/8293-2/starter.jpg[/img]

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 8

Hi Michael,
I also have two starter aka sauer and sauerteig, should get together and talk about some German bread so we could re-introduce it here in America!
Your sauer and sauerteing are very healthy, do you refrigerate them or keep them fed on a regular schedule so you just can bake like that?

Jeremy

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 July 16

[quote="Jeremy"]I already bonded on a river in Colorado on slippery rocks and frigid water! As well rode to 10,000 feet into the mountains and back down in a violent storm with hail and lightining! That was bonding!
My brother went to the most remote and natural park called Niha (spell check) ate bluberry pie with a crust made from bear fat! That park was where the Nez Perce where from, he said it's awesome, real nature raw!

Jeremy[/quote]

LOL, sounds like you had a great time, eh? Mountain weather and conditions can be mercurial.

I love the beauty of temperate forests and rivers as well as fishing there, but I have to admit as far as really roughing it I'm a little too comfortable with most modern comforts. I can handle camping for a couple of weeks provided I'm well equiped. I suppose the truth is we can cope with amazingly adverse conditions but why be a glutton for punishment?!

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 8

Hi Jeremy,

I'm quite sure you famous bakers keep the rye alive in the new worlds . My Sauer and my Sauerteig will only be fed if I use them. According to Meister Calvel I keep my starter at 8-10 degrees C in the fridge. The yeasts stay healthy at least 1 week.

But sourdough seems to be good in survivaling. Some members in the German forum only use it once in a year . After a few cycles of feeding everything works fine again.

I always use a simple 3 stage. A good warranty for a well balanced sourdough.

Hey how many apples did you use in your great loaf? (I used 2!)

Michael

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 9

Michael halo,
What does Skua stand for?
Where are you in Germany?
I think it was one apfel, we make them big her, must be all the hormones

I also keep my sauer and sauerteing in the fridge as well! And I have even left mine unfed on vacation for a month and when I returned it was like new just a few feeds!

Tchuss!

Jeremy

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 9

Oh come on boy! You are living in the big appel and loving it. What's so wrong about a a good New England Granny Smith? I did two Braeburns in, grown in New Zealand . But I prefer the small ones from Japan. Fuji. Sweet but delicious.

hm, hm, hm... this is the point. A rye shouldn't be sticky at all. Too much sugar in dough? Did you throw malt in your rye? A too long bulk time in hot NYC kitchen? With a lot of good cheese and liver pie (how to get this smoky chicken thing ) its not too wrong, but very special.

A Skua is huge see gull, crossing the arctic and antarctic sea. It stands for my second passion: long distance road biking even in icy and stormy weather. I´m living in K-Town.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 9

I did put malt! EEEEK! I also ride a bicycle, what kind do you have?
K-Town, wow I lived in Stuttgart and was born in Karlshrue! Small world!
I have a friend from Aachen on Dans site who translated a formula froma book my Fathers wife sent me of German breads, I guess my sister sent me a vocabulary book for good reason to sharpen up before I go to Schwiez!

Jeremy

New York is fine, just polluted and too crowded!

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 9

Hahaha, my little bird... frame is ultra light carbon, very stiff. An F10. It's what the pro tour team Unibet uses. Selle Italia SLR Carbonio Kit. Thompson seat post. Speedplays, Syntace parts. Mavic open pro ceramic (I love them!). Continental force and attack tires. Shimano brakes and gear, total yield 9.9 lb
[img]http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/2088/palzroubaix55rg8.jpg[/img]

Oh, sorry too much OT. This was not the idea.

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 June 9

Michael,
Well you beat me at that end! I ride a Gios and a Fuji Team bike Aluminum, some Shimano etc....I did a photo and video shoot of a ride I did across to NJ from NY it is somewhere on this site, some one help me find it!
Are you keeping up with the racing in Europe this year, scandalous!
Jeremy

bianchifan's picture
bianchifan 2007 June 10

[quote="Jeremy"]some one help me find it![/quote]
take [url=http://www.sourdough.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=524&hilit=]this[/url] for a while

[quote=Skua]Selle Italia SLR Carbonio Kit[/quote]
Auuoohh... SLR

[quote]The official term for a rye starter is "Sauerteig".[/quote]
What is official?

rbd 2007 March 30

Hey Jake,

Looks rustic allright!!

In a way, it looks pretty darn interesting.. Who knows, you may have kick started a whole new movement of bread finishing!!

In the meantime, maybe next time, bake with seam down

Happy baking

Roland

Skua's picture
Skua 2007 June 10

[quote="bianchifan"]...
[quote]The official term for a rye starter is "Sauerteig".[/quote]
What is official?[/quote]

official baker's language means: using the terms of the mighty German baker's guild. Professional language, no.... language is always strange and magic, and laughs about logic and science.

Jake 2007 April 8

Who knows how to get the free-form cracking effect?? Anyone? What are the exact steps for that?
I tried googling to figure it out, but couldn't find any info. on it.

(Jeremy: any feedback for me? What'd I do wrong?)

Thanks,
Jake

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2007 April 9

What your looking for is to get a regular shaped boule(round) then just do the opposite and place it in the banneton with the "key" (seam) side down rather than up, you need to get the boule tighter and well sealed for a volcano look!

Cheers

Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 14

[quote="Skua"][quote="bianchifan"]...
[quote]The official term for a rye starter is "Sauerteig".[/quote]
What is official?[/quote]

official baker's language means: using the terms of the mighty German baker's guild. Professional language, no.... language is always strange and magic, and laughs about logic and science. [/quote]

G'day Michael, from my understanding "Sauerteig" means "sourdough"! However, I believe the correct term for "starter" is "anstellgut"? Of course, I'm not questioning your German language knowledge, mine is very poor by comparison but my baking knowledge if reasonably fair.

At any rate, If I'm wrong, I'd welcome correction.

Pages

Post Reply

Already a member? Login