Moisture Loss

TeckPoh's picture
TeckPoh

Hi

Now that I've started selling buns (it's only to a handful of regular must-have-TP's bread-friends), I thought I'd post the weight of the buns with the prices. However, I find it's not that easy.

For the small buns of finished baked weight of 75g, over a few weeks' experience, I find that I need a pre-baked weight of 84g...which means a loss of 10% moisture.

Yesterday, I decided to offer mini loaves of finished weight 300g. I thought I'd do fine with a pre-baked weight of 314g. Nope. That baked off to 267g working out to 15% moisture loss. Wow. I guess it must be the bigger surface area of a larger bread.

How do you guys determine how much dough to divide for the finished weight you want? Is there a formula or is it through trial and error?

Thanks.

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Danubian's picture
Danubian 2007 June 24

[quote="TeckPoh"]Hi

Now that I've started selling buns (it's only to a handful of regular must-have-TP's bread-friends), I thought I'd post the weight of the buns with the prices. However, I find it's not that easy.

For the small buns of finished baked weight of 75g, over a few weeks' experience, I find that I need a pre-baked weight of 84g...which means a loss of 10% moisture.

Yesterday, I decided to offer mini loaves of finished weight 300g. I thought I'd do fine with a pre-baked weight of 314g. Nope. That baked off to 267g working out to 15% moisture loss. Wow. I guess it must be the bigger surface area of a larger bread.

How do you guys determine how much dough to divide for the finished weight you want? Is there a formula or is it through trial and error?

Thanks.[/quote]

TP, depending on the type of bread you are making - longer fermentation produces greater losses approx 1.2%. The equipment you are using - scale accuracy etc, at home another 1-2%, ability of the oven as a store of heat, as domestic ovens are notorious for not producing 'solid' heat which means longer slower bake which will mean greater moisture loss. Perhaps you should calculate approx 12-17% loss in the oven. But you should also take the others into account too, especially if you start to make some volume.

TeckPoh's picture
TeckPoh 2007 June 25

Thanks, Boris. It never occurred to me to check for moisture loss till I started selling. Learning about bread stuff is certainly a lifelong education. Fun.

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