Proofing "canvas"?

dukegus
I don't know if it's a silly question but is baking "canvas" the same as the drawing one?
I mean I'm a bit tired of towels and I think I need this for baking breads like baguette because it's stronger than a towel.

Could I get some drawing canvas and use it for bread? Sorry if it's a stupid question :) If it's the same the cost is very small, if it's different do I really need something like that for home baking?

Thx,
Kostas
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matthew 2009 September 22
I got some natural uncoated painting canvas from an art shop and it worked really well, nice and stiff and the loaves didn't stick.  Maybe give it another go with a good coating of flour.
Chow 2010 February 23

I swapped some bread for unprimed artists canvas a while ago now.   Seems to work fine. The Art gu ysuggesteI wash it as it is made in India and who knows what the stiffener is.
Be warned it does shrink a heap when washed.

To flour it I tipped a couple cup fulls ofRye  flour on it and pushed it around, it was suprising how much was used. I now just sprinkle with continental flour every use.

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