Good sourdough bread recipe for TOAST

2 cups active sourdough starter
1/2 cup water
3 cups bread flour
2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. sugar

Mix all ingredients in a bread mixer - I just do 20 minutes on knead. Form up into a large size bread tin, spray with oil, cover with cling wrap, let rise and then into fridge for an overnight retard. Bake for 35-40 minutes in a 220 degree celcius oven. I have tried letting this dough come to room temperature and baked it (good oven rise) and also straight into oven from fridge (no discernable oven rise and had to lengthen cooking times). I only use my sourdough bread for toast as I like the crunch of it - I now cannot stand to have "ordinary" bread toasted. I wonder if there is anyone else who only makes sourdough for toast. Would love another, perhaps more exciting recipe. I'm not very good at adapting other recipes. This recipe from Sourdough French Bread by Cheryl Watson on Countrylife.net Good Baking, and Happy New Year from Latest Fad.

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3 comments

Hi SourDom, thanks for your insight.
How would I know that the dough has been over-kneaded? My loaves always taste great (and because I am not going for the "big hole thing" I am very happy with a nice even crumb (don't want the honey dripping through the holes!)

Wink

I have tried doing the stretches and folds, but I have problems hands, and I take the easy (and less painful) option of the bread machine.
I will try a shorter knead on the next loaf and shall diarize my results. If there is one thing I have learnt about sourdough bread making (no make that two things): 1. you can only make it with truly active starter (not what you only think is active starter, and 2. you must write everything down, every time you bake so you can look back on it.

Wave

Bye, Latest Fad.

We use just about any sourdough for toast. I totally agree with liking the "Crunch" of sourdough toast.

Latest Fad,

welcome to the forum. Most of us here would recognise how the 'sourdough fad' can utterly spoil one's taste buds, and make it difficult to contemplate eating ordinary bread again!

Goodness 20 minutes sounds like a long time in the breadmachine. (This comes from someone who often barely kneads for 20 seconds). It is possible to overknead in the machine.
It mihgt be worth reducing the mixing time, and seeing whether you notice a difference.
One alternative thing that you could try would be to do an initial mix in the machine, then leave for 10 or 20 minutes, then mix again for a minute or two. Then leave for another ten minutes before mixing again for 1 or two minutes. The periods of rest actually develop the dough as much as the 'kneading'.

cheers
Dom