looking for training courses,

Hi ,i am look for some where that provides full time training to become an artisan baker ,any info would be good .i have found a few place in the states but would be more interested in training in Australia . thanks

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[quote="andy6700"]Hi ,i am look for some where that provides full time training to become an artisan baker ,any info would be good .i have found a few place in the states but would be more interested in training in Australia . thanks[/quote]
Try these
Box Hill Institute of TAFE
Holmesglen Intitute of TAFE
Williams Angliss Institute of TAFE
good luck

All of the above colleges offer a high level of bakery trade skills, and are starting to get more serious about artisan baking methods. i would also recommend that you get work at an artisan bakery...please contact me if you need assistance. Graham


Box Hill TAFE doesn't have anything - unless you are refering to 'Bakers Delight"


I thought some people might be interested to hear about 2 such events that I have attended.  As a baker who has muddled through with books, this site, Dan Lepard"s forum and years of home baking I was keen to try out some hands on experiences in 'proper' bakeries. 

The first one was the no - holds - barred generously funded kitchens of South Australia's Regency College of TAFE.  I had previously attended Regency so knew you have to ask lots of questions and push the lecturers to fill in the gaps in the course as it's structured around apprentices finding their own pathways to learning (If that is the jargon!).  The good bits are:  -the VERY passionate lecturer Leon Bailey who just gets a big kick out of and is interested in anything to do with sourdough and slow fermentation and who takes it home to play with in the back yard wood oven,

-the ovens, proofing cabinets, different flours and other ingredients, other students (pros and home bakers), relatively, I think, small groups and opportunities to understand formulae and dough handling methods

-four 7 hour days focussed on artisan baking.

I'll continue re the other course later with more time.. 


Another thing I thought of re the Regency TAFE Artisan 1 course was that there was quite a bit of talk and theory aroung sourdough and we each began our own starter but we did not bake 100% sourdough in any more than very small quantities.  It would have been pretty interesting to learn about extrapolating 100g quantities of sourdough starters into the 70kg lots of dough we produced using preferments and poolishes..?! 

The other workshop attended was the 3 hour lesson at Brasserie Bread in Sydney.  This was accessable learning and fun in a purpose built classroom next to the bakery through which we were given a good look. 

One of the bakers took the class and took us through mixing our own sourdough loaf by hand, resting, shaping and proving, as well as using some of the yeasted dough from the bakery to shape batons, baguettes, epis and plaits, then baking off and tasting Brasserie's range with wine and cheese.  There was plenty of time for questions and discussion.

It was very interesting to see the different proving boards, ovens and packing up of the large quantity of bread, as well as how consistent an artisan product can be with quite a few staff dividing and shaping by hand.  

So I think the purpose of introducing customers to the behind the scenes of producing bread of this quality in an open friendly and fun way achieved the goal cleverly.

I hope Brasserie Bread go ahead and hold the Professional training session as I reckon they'd conduct it in an open and genuine manner.

By the way the Brasserie Bread baguettes are ex.  Yummo.

Any fair feedback from others on training anywhere?