Easy Sour Dough


Hi All, I've successfully created a couple of loaves after 1 months break. Driven by the bland taste of most of the bread bought in shops I reached for my starter that hadn't been touched in I don't know how long.
I built up the starter with light rye flour over 2 days and I've never seen it more active. I then added white bakers flour, water salt and oil mixed and let it and let it stand for 20min. I then oiled a surface and kneaded it for 30sec and put it in the fridge over night. The next morning I took it out and left it for 2 hours. I then proceeded to put it in baskets for proving - then baked.
The results were very satisfying - success in taste, appearance with minimal hassel.
What do you think of my methods?

4 users have voted.


SourDom 2007 May 22

Well done Barry,

your loaves look great, and you are well on you way.
Don't be afraid to keep trying different things - but keep a note if you can of what you are doing, so that you can return to successes.

A couple of things that you could try:
1. Try adding in one or even two more kneads before putting the dough in the fridge - just to make sure that it is fully mixed
2. When the dough comes out of the fridge slash it, and see whether it already has a rich network of bubbles below the surface. If it does, skip the 'rewarming' stage, and just shape it. Then let it prove/warm for maybe 3-4 hours before baking.


Barry 2007 May 24

Hi Dom,
I'll definitly skip the rewarming stage next time as there is quite a network of bubbles.
I thought I might try adding a tea spoon of bread improver also? It may sound bad but I'd like to see if there is an improvement in the crumb and the oven spring and also the keeping qualities.
I thought I'd also use a cup of beer to replace some water to add to the flavour.
I'll let you know how it goes.

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