The crumb


I've bake a few loaves and i'm getting the hang of the process. I did a couple of loaves today and feel the balance of yeast bacteria is good to my taste.
I'm wondering about the crumb my loaves seem wet and heavy. There is only one baker doing sour dough in town and the crumb is similar mabe a bit wetter.
I've been using a process which involves overnight fermentation and limited keading which suits me but could it be saturating the crumb too much. Ater a couple of days the crumb also seems to harden.

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SourDom 2007 April 12


couple of alternatives come to mind.
You may not be baking long enough - try extending the bake by 10 minutes or more (as a rule of thumb, bake until you think the loaf is ready - then bake for 5 minutes more...)
Also - make sure that the bread has cooled sufficiently before cutting in to it - otherwise you will have a sticky crumb


Barry 2007 April 12

I've posted some pictures on the same blog, 3 new ones at the end of the gallery for Sourdough 2.
I'm baking on average 45min so it may not be enough for the loaf size. i am allowing it to cool and finish cooking.
So the amount of hydration really has no effect on the how wet the crumb will be?
Come to think of it the ciabatta starts very wet and finishes quite dry it seems.
The rye flour content may also cotribute to the heavy wet crumb?

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