Second Bakes... better

Heres the roundup of my second effort at sourdough. I used the 750g Rye Loaf Recipe and this time followed it to the dot.. well not really, I kneaded with oil instead of flour, and forgot to add the salt to Loaf 1

Embarassed

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/4579-1/wk2_1.jpg[/img]
Loaf 1. Turned out well without any salt.

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/4583-1/wk2_2top.jpg[/img]
Loaves 2

[img]http://www.sourdough.com.au/gallery/d/4581-1/wk2_2.jpg[/img]
Loaf 2. Added the salt this time. Cells weren't as large. Used Treacle instead of molasses in this one. I also cooked this one a little less. The outside looks better, but it might have need a bit longer on the inside.

Well I think they're a big improvement on last week. Any comments, suggestions, questions?

The taste was alright, however not very sour. The starter may not yet be as robust as it should.

Just a quick question. When making the starter for these loaves (autolyse is it called?) instead of using a teaspoon of preexisting starter, I used it all. I just mixed in the flours and water in with the 200gms of preexisting starter. Is this timesaver a good idea?

David

repeatedly, water covered soap, covered oil, covered dough covered hands

10 comments

Hmm...very interesting. That way, we don't have to give the hooch an evil eye. I must try this out.


Bianchifan is a great friend of drying his sourdough then grinding it to a powder which he stores for long periods of time in glass jars and uses this powder to start a new sourdough whenever he feels like baking.
Maybe he will put some pics of his breads and pizzas in here one day for you to see.

Razz

[quote="giles"]
I only have a wholemeal starter. When I want a white loaf, I just refresh twice with white flour.
[/quote]
That's the best way one can do, I think.
Wholemeal is only neccesary to force the process from scratch, when having a stable culture any kind of flour meal of whatever is possible.

It's always a good idea to store a second culture made with rye wholemeal.
The balance of lact.acid and acet.acid is quite different between wheat culture and rye culture.

Baking with wheat you may use the wheat starter and feed it with preferred kind of flour.
Baking with rye you may take the rye starter.

I' ve got my two starters from a 3-stage prozess. The result has been
cut and grinded and stored in closed up glasses.

[quote="lightningbolt"]
Yes I did have some starter left over, which is now in the fridge. This week's task is to try to massage some of it into a 100% white starter. Does a little wholemeal (instead of rye) in a white starter stop those white-starter-worries??
[/quote]

I only have a wholemeal starter. When I want a white loaf, I just refresh twice with white flour. I think this is "good enough" and I don't bother myself about the few grams of wholemeal that end up in the final white loaf.

Bill maintains multiple starters; I'm not sure it's worth the trouble. But I want to try a rye starter one of these days, so we'll see.

Smile

Giles

[quote]
Spied your tin of cream crackers....haven't had that in a while.
[/quote]

I think we've only had cream crackers once...when we bought them with the tin around 10 years ago! It humbly sits in the corner and is usually refilled with water crackers. But thanks for the tip.

Yes I did have some starter left over, which is now in the fridge. This week's task is to try to massage some of it into a 100% white starter. Does a little wholemeal (instead of rye) in a white starter stop those white-starter-worries??

repeatedly, water covered soap, covered oil, covered dough covered hands

The starter for this bread is one I maintain at 1/3 rye 2/3 white, that is 33g rye to 66g white and 100g water. I refresh the starter 12 hours before baking so that it is past its peak and has developed more sour.
The "sour" I prefer for a rye loaf is not like the up front sour of a white loaf, it's more of an underlying sour that comes out as you chew the crust. One of my starters gives this type of taste and that is why it is becoming popular in the US and Canada.

Well done David!

There are some Tuscan breads that are made deliberately without salt. They stale much more quickly than normal breads.

When I tried making one of these I confess that I found the resulting loaf looked fine but was inedible...

cheers
Dom


Happy Graduation, David! Your loaves are just great!

As for using all the starter, if you're confident your starter is thriving and active, sure you can use what's existing. Did you save some for the next round(s)?

Spied your tin of cream crackers....haven't had that in a while. How do you eat yours? What I used to do:

Smeared lots of butter on it, then sprinkle with sugar,

Shocked

Eat with Kaya ( a local coconut milk egg jam),
Dunk in Milo or coffee.

Very Happy


Yes the starter is 30% Rye 70% White. Edit 33 rye 66 white

Surprised

:o

[quote]
In Germany we would make such a bread with a 100 % rye-starter (RST) and putting 50 to 60% of Rye flour into the starter.
[/quote]

Did you mean a 100% Hydration starter with 50-60% of the flour being Rye?

It's Bill's recipe so he'll be able to answer all of your questions about it

repeatedly, water covered soap, covered oil, covered dough covered hands

Well, David, if it tastes to you ..leave the salt

Very Happy

Autolyse has nothing to do with the starter, its a process of getting hydration to the flour and starting fermentation.
I've just looked at the recipe and now I'm a little confused about the starter.
What kind of flour should be used?
Is it right, that there is a flour-mix in starter?
In Germany we would make such a bread with a 100 % rye-starter (RST) and putting 50 to 60% of Rye flour into the starter.
But the recipe seems to do it other way..

Nevertheless, nice bread..