Flour Additives

This discussion looks at issues surounding flour additives added to flour before the baker receives it.

15 comments

Our regular wheat flours in Australia have been adulterated by the addition of thiamin, etc. A bag of Bakers flour now has an ingredient list:

            • wheaten flour
            • thiamin

Roller milled Wholemeal flour:

  • wheaten flour
  • wheat germ
  • coarse bran
  • fine bran
  • gluten
  • thiamin
  • folic acid

 

This is really a subject for another thread; Tekky, can you move this and start another thread, or do I have to delete it?

 

 


One of the major artisan flour suppliers in the US.
Only their ordinary flour is enriched. Their organic flour is not enriched.
"

**Enrichment includes: Wheat flour enriched (niacin, reduced iron, thiamin, riboflavin, folic acid) and malted barley flour."

Organic flours in Australia are not 'enriched' either, it's only conventional stuff.

Jack, do you remember when flour in Britain was bromated?
All flour in the UK except wholemeal is required to be enriched

Calcium Carbonate 235-390mg/100g
Iron Minimum 1.65mg/100g
Thiamine 0.24mg/100g
Nicotinic acid 1.6mg/100g

These regulations go back to 1942 after studies suggested additional calcium was needed for healthy bone development.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1998/19980141.htm

These additives are not required to be declared on the labelling, and usually are not
http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk/organic/info-about-flour.htm

Bromate was prohibited in 1990 after some evidence of cancer risk

In Australia flour for bread (inlcuding organic and wholemeal)  MUST by law contain

(a) no less than 2 mg/kg and no more than 3 mg/kg of folic acid; and

(b) no less than 6.4 mg/kg of thiamin


http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/_srcfiles/Standard_2_1_1_Cereals_v97.pdf


I also note that from 27th September 2009 the salt in bread in New Zealand must be iodized salt.

Do you have exemption from these regulations for sourdough?



Organic flour is exempt see below:

[quote]

(4) Subclause 4(2) does not apply to wheat flour for making bread, which is

represented as organic.[/quote]


And further....

[quote]

(4) Subclause (3) does not apply to bread which is represented as organic.

[/quote]

Not as far as I'm aware; but if an 'organic' claim is made its deemed exempt. 

[quote=Jacklang]All flour in the UK except wholemeal is required to be enriched

Calcium Carbonate 235-390mg/100g
Iron Minimum 1.65mg/100g
Thiamine 0.24mg/100g
Nicotinic acid 1.6mg/100g

These regulations go back to 1942 after studies suggested additional calcium was needed for healthy bone development.[/quote]

Since 42?! I'm truely astounded. Although, during and after the war there were all sorts of things done that were deemed to be for the collective good.

Are millers testing their flour first and adding enrichments to come up to the required levels, or are they just dosing?  


  

Hello, I've just become a member and wondered if you knew if brominated flour is used  here in australia, if it is where can I buy any bread or buy flour to make bread, I live in Cairns and have just become aware of bromine and its effect on people.
Thanks, Karen H 
[quote=karen h]
Hello, I've just become a member and wondered if you knew if brominated flour is used  here in australia, if it is where can I buy any bread or buy flour to make bread, I live in Cairns and have just become aware of bromine and its effect on people.
Thanks, Karen H [/quote]

Hi Karen, welcome to the board.

Flour in Australia has never been bromated in the past - fas far as I'm aware - and continues to be bromate free. In the recent past most  [url=http://www.fermex.com.au/products/products.php?cat=Bread+Improvers]bread improvers[/url] in Australia contained bromate. If I remeber correctly, bromated bread improver was discontinued in 1992. Bromate is no longer deemed an allowable 'additive' in bread.

Thanks

Hi.

I got some Coopers brewing malt. The packet said "light dry malt" and the ingredients were "Malted barley". It dosesn't look roasted and the packet doesn't say it's roasted.

Is the same as diastatic malt?


 

because I don't use Coopers Brewers malt. Best for you to ask your supplier if it's "enzyme active" or "enzyme inactive". If it's active then it's diastatic.
I've used Coopers for beer making and I don't think it's active.  It's basically add water, yeast and hops type product to make beer.  It does taste great in bread though.  Like cornflakes.

Cheers,

Tony



Danubian, Panevino (is this from bread (Pane) & wine (vino)?Good combination anyway.

Thanks for the information. I got some organic barley grain. I'll have a go at sprouting it and making diastatic malt.


 

I heard recently from a fairly reliable source that feathers are added to flour as a source of fibre. Does anyone know anything about this?
[quote=kochie]I heard recently from a fairly reliable source that feathers are added to flour as a source of fibre. Does anyone know anything about this? [/quote]

No, I don't know anything about this at all. See the [url=http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/_srcfiles/Standard_2_1_1_Cereals_v101.pdf]Food Standards Australia & New Zealand; Cereals[/url]