Parbaking sourdough, what do you reckon?


Graham's picture
Graham 2008 March 11

I have heard that parbaked sourdough operations have been tried at least twice in Australia and not been sufficiently embraced by bread eaters. But who knows the future, with comments like this from the above article...

''My bread really was fresh,'' she said. ''But that parbaked stuff comes right out of the oven. It looks gorgeous, if they do it right. And the sign on it doesn't say freshly browned, or freshly baked off. It says freshly baked.''

Is parbake only suitable for 'faster' 'lighter' Italian/French style breads that are designed to be consumed within several hours? The idea of 'hot bread' sourdough is intriguing. Is that its main appeal?

The machine-made angle not so exciting for artisan bakers! I think the 'artisan' spin is just that. Artisan is about 'process' rather than just ingredients. How much extra energy is required to freeze and re-bake the product? It would be interesting to see a power per kg graph for parbake vs conventional baking.

Agree that it would be good to hear from someone that has tried it. Jeremy?

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy 2008 March 12
I have actually baked it in Colorado. Seen it done in Switzerland, and La Brea Bakery is the big cheese in that side of the business, can't say I liked it much, seems a bit like a cheater, make your own bread fresh and that is what I think!

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