Substituting starter for commercial yeast

I know that this topic has been addressed and I agree with most everyone that it makes no sense to make a yeast recipe into a sourdough one since they are different "beasts."  Here's the conundrum, I love sourdough bread and have been tasked with making Swedish Limpe for a holiday gathering with fellow foodies.  I have never made this type of bread (but I love researching food), but found out it originally was made with beer wort. So, a natural yeast, such as my sourdough starter makes sense.  Does anyone have a recipe for this bread using sourdough or have a great yeast recipe and advice on how to substitute wild yeast for commercial yeast?  Any help is appreciated.  I would love to give this complex bread the heartiness and wheatness of a slow ferment.

 

Thanks,

Tracy

4 comments

"Back in the day" when every town had both a brewery and a bakery it was commonplace for bakers to get wort from the brewery, but this was not necessarily "wild" yeast (exception being Lambic beer). I believe that Budweiser is still a major supplier of bakers' yeast. So it might not be wise to generalize that brewer's wort = sourdough.

 

Keep in mind too that limpe is quite a sweet loaf, and all that sugar really challenges any yeast.

 

Good luck,

 

M

http://familjerecept.wordpress.com/2010/01/11/surdegslimpa/

The recipe is in Swedish, but Google translate will do a good job (below, with some adjustments). This uses a rye based starter. I find Limpa too sweet fro my taste, preferring the plain rye.

If you want to use brewer's yeast, it should be available from specialist "homebrew beer" suppliers. These supply yeast in gm/oz quantities rahter than kg/lb. There are lots of these in AU and UK, but you may need to go online for mail order in the US. Then I'd just use it to make the preferment.

 

********************************************Sourdough Limpa *******************

Day 1, evening

     150 grams sourdough rye starter
     300 grams of water
     150 grams rye flour

Mix and let ferment for maximum volume. As I understand it, it grows as long as it has a new food. longer and sourdough bacteria
die and it collapses. So let the dough to stand as long as it grows, but no longer.

Recommended temp is 28 degrees (Centiggrade). Fermentation can be slowed by the dough is set in the fridge. 28 degrees is to maximize the amount of lactic acid bacteria, so that the dough does not become so acidic. The dough ferments when hotter even a little faster, and can be mixed in the early morning and the bread baked in the evening.

Day 2, morning

     yesterday's preferment
     350 grams of water
     0.5 ml oil
     0.5 ml syrup
     950 grams of Manitoba cream or flour special

Mix with the machine for 8 minutes. Pour in 1 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon of Santa Maria bread spices. Mix 8 minutes. Push down dough that sticks to the top of the dough hook, but be careful that no gluten strands are cut.

Sprinkle a little flour, put a towel over the bowl and let rise until doubled in size. To ferment in a lightly oiled bowl makes it easier to get out afterwards.

Divide in two parts, the parts to work a little bit, and then round off for two loaves. Let rise in a bowl or banneton so they retain their shape.

Bake as usual, eg by putting the loaves in 275 degree oven, and then cut directly to 200. This gives a fine finish. If you want a harder surface, bake in any other way.

If you do not have a baking stone, put the plate in the oven while it heats, a
nd then quickly add the bread there before the plate goes back in the oven.

 

<edit> Santa maria is a swedish brand of spices - these are availabale online, but the bread spice contains Ingredients: Fennel, Anise, Caraway. so you can almost certainly make something similar yourself.


[quote=sourdoughmama]

I know that this topic has been addressed and I agree with most everyone that it makes no sense to make a yeast recipe into a sourdough one since they are different "beasts."  Here's the conundrum, I love sourdough bread and have been tasked with making Swedish Limpe for a holiday gathering with fellow foodies.  I have never made this type of bread (but I love researching food), but found out it originally was made with beer wort. So, a natural yeast, such as my sourdough starter makes sense.  Does anyone have a recipe for this bread using sourdough or have a great yeast recipe and advice on how to substitute wild yeast for commercial yeast?  Any help is appreciated.  I would love to give this complex bread the heartiness and wheatness of a slow ferment.

 

Thanks,

Tracy

[/quote]

 

I just buy a really good bottle conditioned beer and harvest the yeast from the bottom!

This was made using the yeast from the bottom of a "Hair Of The Dog Fred"

http://www.hairofthedog.com/fred-detail.html

 Focaccia goodness!

[IMG]http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i230/bigdonniebrasco/P1020251.jpg[/IMG]

 1 pakage of active dry yeast

1 teaspoon ganualted sugar

1/4 cup warm water (100 - 115F)

2 cups ale, or beer heated to lukewarm

1/4 to 1/2 honey

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon ground cardamon (optional)

1 tablespoon caraway seeds, or anisseed, crushed

2 tablespoons chopped candied, or fresh grated orange peel

2 1/2 cups rye flour

3 cups all purpose unbleached flour.

 

If you want the rest of the directions, tell me and I will post it. It comes from the book "Beard on Bread"