Poh's Kitchen - Tasmanian Flour - Callington Mill and Companion Bakery

Graham's picture

Sourdough Companion were fortunate to be able to work with Poh and the ABC crew when they visited Tasmania early in 2011. Poh toured Callington Mill and made sourdough at Companion Bakery. The bakery is run by Graham Prichard, who operates this website.

This forum post is for anyone that has questions or comments about stone milling or sourdough baking shown on Poh's Kitchen season 2, episode 2.

First broadcast on ABC1 (Australia) at 8PM on Wednesday August 31, 2011.

If you miss that screening view Poh's episodes online at http://www.abc.net.au/tv/pohskitchen/episodes/

Poh's blog: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/pohskitchen/pohs_place/


5 users have voted.


farinam's picture
farinam 2011 August 31

Well done Graham!

Not sure how many loaves a day you produce but I reckon you'd be built like a weight lifter if you make them all using the kneading technique shown in the episode.

It's the method that I use though I don't normally fling it so high.  Is that essential?



Merrid 2011 August 31
That was fun - I don't fling my dough about like that; but yours seemed to rise much faster. I shall have to try it!
Graham's picture
Graham 2011 September 1

Glad you liked the show. I hadn't seen it either until last night....Poh certainly brings out the best in people.

The 'fling' is another opportunity to stretch and develop the dough / gluten strands. Agree that it is not entirely necessary as there is a better opportunity to stretch by pulling, when the dough hits and sticks to the bench. I guess the fling movement is an important part of setting up the bench stretch.

There is something very 'French' and performative about this method....and here is the Frenchman that first demonstrated it to me: http://sourdough.com/video/hand-kneading-demonstrated-french-baker-simon-gosset


Merrid 2011 September 1

It's certainly very theatrical - but I have a sinking feeling that trying it on my tiny kitchen bench might produce unexpected results...

panfresca 2011 September 1

 That was a great segment Graham - and nice to put a face to the name, as well as to see Ben, the miller. Just a shame we couldn't see a bit more of the bakery. The rest of the show, using your flour, was most enjoyable too.

I don't know who was behind the restoration of the mill, but I think it was a fantastic idea. Towns like this can become a bit of a pastiche, a tourist theme park... just look at Hahndorf in SA and Richmond in Tas, so it's good to see something real which brings life back into the town.


Zhiem 2011 September 1

If a picture is worth a thousand words, a moving picture (particularly with the lovely Poh in attendance) is a whole library of information. Well done Graham and here's hoping you will get some more appearancess on the telly as time goes on.

davo 2011 September 2

Watched on tape last night - great show.

Poh seems the most enthusiastic and least pretentious TV cooking personality going around, although I do also really like the food safari series with Maeve O'Mara.

Mill was fascinating, and I saw the answer to my query in another thread about how developed are the bubbles in Graham's bulk fermented dough, on scaling...

I loved the way Graham said something along the lines of the whole process being basically out of control, and the notion that you just ride that through. So many people seem obsessed with the minute detail of one aspect of the process where there are so many other variables that will affect it anyway.

Post Reply

Files must be less than 400 MB.
Allowed file types: png gif jpg jpeg.


  • Allowed HTML tags: <p> <br> <a> <em> <strong> <h2> <h3> <h4> <h5> <h6> <table> <thead> <th> <tbody> <td> <tr> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.