Makings of a great starter

Day 1Day 2

 

So after 8 or so years (on and off), this also includes me currently running and baking at wholesale sourdough bakery;  I have never baked any bread or baked a cake at home. This needed to change so late last night I decided to start my own sourdough starter, I've decided to only do a basic white sourdough starter with build up time of at least 3 weeks to ensure it is strong enough and full of awesome flavour. I'll be posting up progress pics along the way and of course a final pic of the end baked product.

For my starter I used:

100g organic white flour

100ml room temperture water

1 L glass jar

For the first 5 days I'll be refreshing every night with 50g of same flour as above and 50ml of room temperture of water.

 

Day 2:

Well I didn't get a chance to refresh after 24 hours so instead refreshed the following morning, when I woke up I found the starter had grown considerably which I wasnt expecting. Because it was longer then 24 hours I decided to throw out most of the starter and only left a small amount and added 120g of same flour and 120ml of water.  Above is the starter after the latest refresh. 

3 comments

Congratulations on your new journey. There is a lot of advice available and you will find that your start will take on a life and characteristics of it's own.

Don't be afrtaid to experiment.

Elkhorn

I have found that the yeast and bacteria don't eat all the food in the starter the first few days.  I don't start feeding the starter until I see some activity.  When you skipped the first day I actually think it was helpful in getting the starter going.

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose." Jim Elliot

 

When I was beginning my starter, I read somewhere that it is good to stir it frequently. This mixes in more air as well as helping the "food" get to all of the hungry yeast. I read this again this weekend in Reinhart's whole grains bread book. Sitrring also gives you something to do as one is obsessed with starter activity at the beginning. It means you have an excuse to look and putter.

Sheryl at 108 breads