Granite slab as baking stone...

Hi All,

I was wondering if granite slabs can be used as baking stone? I got a slab which is about an inch thick that's unpolished on one side. Can I use that side for baking? Any harmful fumes or residue?

Thanks a lot...

Cheers...

Don

Cheers...
Don

9 comments

I'm using a granite slabs fore baking since a coupleof years, granite is a very great choice. My actual stone is unpolished, I think there isn't any problem, but the slab in commercial sold "Hot Stones"( a type of raqulette) is polished.

I have just got a terracota tile and wound the oven as high as it would go+- 250 for about an hour before I put it back to baking temp and no probs at all and also cooked piza on it at the highest setting and agian no probs with cracking.

[quote="donyeokl"]
Bet you've got lots of orders for that wonderful looking Lame's... Its a wonderful piece of work.

Laughing

BTW, how do you actually mount the blade onto the handle?
Cheers...
Don
[/quote]

Don, the lame is split where you see the two screws, the screws close the wood tightly to pinch the razorblade.

[quote="donyeokl"]
Hi Bill,

Cool... Think I will go buy a piece and have a go. Am worried that it will crack or break into pieces once heated.

Shocked

They seem to have lots of small holes and looks rather porous...
Cheers...
Don
[/quote]

Don, those terracotta pieces are fired at a temperature far higher than you will ever cook at so I don't think there is a problem with them cracking, so long as you make sure they are very dry. Terracotta will readily absorb moisture.

Hi Bill,

Cool... Think I will go buy a piece and have a go. Am worried that it will crack or break into pieces once heated.

Shocked

They seem to have lots of small holes and looks rather porous...

Bet you've got lots of orders for that wonderful looking Lame's... Its a wonderful piece of work.

Laughing

BTW, how do you actually mount the blade onto the handle?

Cheers...

Don

Cheers...
Don

Hi Bill,

Thanks again. Have you tried using those round red clay trays meant for the base of the flower pots? The ones that we get from the nursery or DIY store, I was contemplating on trying that. Do we use baking soda solution to wash the stones before using it for the first time?

Cheers...

Don

Cheers...
Don

Hi Don,
I've never used baking soda in the wash but I can't see it doing any harm. I use an unglazed unsealed quarry tile myself and now and then give it a scrub with normal washup detergent and rinse well.
I haven't used one of those terracotta trays myself but I remember reading somewhere that a terracotta flower pot is good for baking a Pannetone, it gives the authentic cone shape. Now that's a project worth a try, except a flop would be an expensive mistake due to the cost of the ingredients.
No baking for a couple of days, have to go down to the workshop and make a batch of Lame's.

There was a discussion on Dan Lepards forum about this, apparently granite is fine. Just give a 1" slab plenty of time to warm up.
Don't make the mistake that I do at least twice a year, don't put a cold stone into a hot oven. Sometimes I put the oven on and forget the stone for a while and of course when I put the stone in, CRACK!

Embarassed

Give the stone a good wash, let it [b]completely[/b] dry in the sun, and give it a good baking at your normal baking temp which should sterilise the stone and cook off any nasties.

Hi, I am new and trying to make my first starter.

I am reading Wild Sourdough book and it recommends a granite tile as the most effective base for bread baking. But it recommends a tile not thicker than 10 mm, (0.4 in).

Does anyone know where I can get a granite tile??