Cold climate baking!



I have been baking sourdough bread for some months now and I have always been happy with my loaves but since I found this website I want to do better, your breads are just so beautiful and I want that big holed, chewy bread!

With most of the recipes/methods I have seen here people are letting the dough rise in about 29°c heat. Well I live in Iceland and it's safe to say that we don't have that kind of temperatures in our houses (or outdoors for that matter:) ) and the only way i can make my dough rise in that kind of temperature is to set the oven on the lowest temp. I don't like that since it takes a lot of energy and the temperature isn't stable.

Does any of you have another method of rising that gives beautiful results?

thanks alot!


7 users have voted.


Alvaremj's picture
Alvaremj 2013 October 23



There seems to be a lot of discussion around time and temperature. I typically let my dough rise until I see good fermentation and then it goes in the refridgerator overnight before shape and proof the following day. 2 to 3 hours before retard then 1 to 2 hours proof. We are nowhere near the temp here that you have but my house stays at 65f 18c on a typical day. I havent had any problems getting a good rise and decent crumb structure.

I would suggest experimenting with a larger amount of preferment and longer rise times than you generally see here. there is no reason you cant make great bread there. I hope that helps and keep me posted.




highsky's picture
highsky 2013 October 26

Have u tried the old version of covering with warm blankets?

More eficient  is the covering with sleeping bag. Just make the adjustments after your first try.

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