working on producing a good wholewheat bread


Since I started on the home baking path I've been trying to achieve a good wholewheat bread. I wasn't getting much success with the recipes I came across. Since I had such good success with Rossnroller's version of Hamelman's Light Rye, I thought I'd try and tweak the basic recipe to achieve a wholewheat version.

The original recipe has 450g bread flour and 60g rye flour to 180g starter. I use 100% wholewheat starter. At first I tried just replacing the rye with wholemeal - great results. So I've been gradually increasing the proportion of wholemeal flour to see how it goes. Small water increases until dough feels right.

This one (baked about a fortnight ago - I'm a bit slow getting to the blog) is 40% wholewheat and I'm still delighted with the result. It was a present to a friend so I didn't get the crumb shots as I didn't take camera. I recreated this one for myself last weekend but forgot to take photos before it got polished off - the crumb was good though.




eyendall 2010 November 15

Your loaf looks terrific. I assume you are using a combination  of white flour and whole wheat flour to which you add some rye flour. How much of each? Thanks..

breadlover 2010 November 15

Hi eyendall,

Thanks! The professional photography from a friend helps :)

This version I have no rye flour added. I used the following:

180g starter (100% wholewheat, 100% hydration)
310g water
400g white bread flour
110g wholewheat flour
10g salt

To be really precise, it's actually 39% wholewheat, not 40%! :)

Hope that helps


rossnroller 2010 November 15

Fantastic-looking bread.

I also like to tweak the Hamelman recipe using wholegrain flour instead of rye, but I retain the rye element by using a starter comprising 30% rye.

Anyway, great stuff! Developing your own breads according to personal preferences is where home-baking really starts to get interesting, I reckon. I almost always tweak recipes when I'm cooking, but I'm confident about what works and what doesn't in the kitchen, cooking and traditional regional foods having been a serious interest for a lot of years. It took me a while to start making tweaks and developing my own breads - you're off to a flying start! 

Best of baking to you!

breadlover 2010 November 16

Ross - thanks for your encouragement and support. I've been cooking for years and I too am comfortable with tweaking/merging/refining recipes so it's only natural that I do it for bread too :) I can only hope that one day I achieve the giddy heights of home bread baking that the likes of yourself and others on this site are purveying the world from! I only wish I had more time to experiment.

Dorean - thanks! Pattern imprinted on the crust was from the floured tea-towel the dough proved in. Completely unplanned in this case, but I'll be certainly be doing it again.

Onward and upward!


LeadDog's picture
LeadDog 2010 November 17

 Hey that floured tea towel makes a very nice looking pattern.  I would have never guessed that is how you had done it.

breadlover 2010 November 17

I know, a nice little accident! I have sinced checked all my tea towels for different patterns, but none have the same 'depth' (if you know what I mean) to produce a deep enough imprint.

Millciti's picture
Millciti 2010 November 17

Seems we have the same taste in Tea Towels, I used one just like that when I first started.  I think you are doing just fine, already inspiring the rest of us lot - with your lovely bread.  So will a crumb shot be showing up soon? 





breadlover 2010 November 19

No crumb shot for this one Terri as I gave it away! Will get one for the next one I produce.... Thanks for the encouragement :)

eyendall 2010 November 20

I modified your recipe using 1 cup of 100% rye sourdough starter, 20g sea salt,  and 100% unbleached white bread flour. Good oven-spring, nice crumb and great tasting result.

eyendall 2010 November 21


great to hear eyendall - any pics?



Sorry no pics: ate it too quickly.

In truth though it was not an exceptional looking loaf.  Nice enough but nothing special for this exalted company.  Will keep working on it.

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