The sliced, wrapped, white, sandwich loaf

timb

Is the sliced, wrapped, white sandwich loaf Britain's gift to the world or a culinary crime of the highest order? 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-13670278

 

This is an interesting article about the history of the Chorleywood Process invented in the 1960s, which created the kind of bread that dominates the market in the UK and around the world.  It has all the advantages: softer, cheaper, longer lasting...  It is now to be found in 30 countries around the world.

 

TimB

Replies

Natalie Drest 2011 June 8

 I had to read one paragraph several times... (my eyes!) before I realised that the quote was by someone named "Polson", rather than "Poison"...

 

...for that is what this stuff is!

 

As far as I can tell, the only benefit it has had, is that people like me have either sought out good bread, or resorted to learning about and making our own bread. Mind you, that is a huge benefit, there are few things more satisfying than home baking.

bakerjohn 2011 June 9

Couldn't agree more.

For me, the most telling part of the report was the scientist proudly telling of how they enabled cheap bread by adding fats and all manner of addditives, and later saying he didn't believe this was contributing to the rise in people who can't tolerate breads made by the CW process .

 

As Natalie said, at least it has motivated many of us to try to create better alternatives by our own hands .

Polenta 2011 August 12

 The Chorleywood Process is the MIXING of the dough. Not the traveling of the bread through the process.

They invented the high speed mixing process that these large plant bakeries.

 The gluten in the flour regulates how much time is needed to mix. It's called the "falling number"

For around 300kg's of dough (water,flour,etc) the Chorleywood Process takes about 2 min to mix.

High speed like you don't understand !!!

This makes the bread visually aproved and consistent in production. 

But not that much in flavor and acceptance. 

More of to feed the masses regulary and consistently. 

Heartless.

  

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