Converting a recipe to sourdough

Vincent

So I'm sat here in rainy rainy England at 8:00 at night when I get the urge to get ahead and make my dough for tomorrows baking. The thing is I want to get the bread in the oven for 9:00 in the morning ideally? Also I'm sick of trawling for sourdough specific recipes and want to be able to convert my old favourites for use with a sourdough starter. After some digging around on the web I settle on using 100g of my 100% hydration starter and subtracting 50g of water and 50g of the white flour from my recipe.

The recipe I have is for two small loaves so as an experiment I've decided to knead then split the dough and go straight into the proving baskets. These will be left on the side then go into the fridge before bed. I will assess them to see if they've 'doubled in size' in the morning.

Here is my converted recipe. I'm afraid I don't know how to do that table thing but if anyone cares to enlighten me...

  • 100g of 100% Hydration sourdough starter
  • 300g Wholemeal bread flour
  • 150g White bread flour
  • 300g Water
  • 10g salt

I found that the last dough I made developed a dry 'crust' whilst proving so I've decided to try covering my lovely new proving baskets with split food bags to prevent this happening.

I would be interested to know if anyones managed to succsefully play with their proving times to get them down to about 12 hours?

Lets see what tomorrow brings....apart from more rain!

Replies

LeadDog's picture
LeadDog 2012 June 23

 The formula looks to be very good the percentages calculate out to be in the area of what I would use to make bread.  I personally go a little bit lighter on the salt but you are dead on for normal with the salt.  I have done a few things to get the fermentation to hurry up.  Putting the proving basket in a sunny window works wonders.  I have also turned the oven on for 1 or 2 mins and then back off.  Then put the dough in the warm oven.

Old Possum's picture
Old Possum 2012 June 23

You would need to test your individual oven but if I'm in a tearing hurry I pop my starer/bread into the oven with the light turned on. In my oven that equates to around 30 deg C which speeds things up nicely. Obviously you need to remove it before heating the oven for baking.

Vincent 2012 June 23

Putting the proving basket in a sunny window works wonders

LeadDog you'd laugh if you could see through my window. Half the area round here is flooded we're having the wettest summer on record. Still I take your point, I fear I'm going to miss my 9:00 target though I wonder whether I should have just left it on the counter, it's about 11-14C at the moment and always a steady temerature in there?

Vincent 2012 June 23

Well I decided to put them in the oven with the light on, which turned out to be a bit of a mistake. The oven got much hotter this way than I expected and the dough over proved slightly. Still I baked it anyway and despite the lack of oven spring the bread tasted delicious and the crumb was pretty darn good - as you can see from the photo's.

 

On a slightly more somber note I think I might have ruined my new and only proving baskets when the dough stuck to the bottom. I tried rubing in a load more flour and scrapping the bottom of the baskets but to my frustration the dough for the cinnamon swirls I'm making also stuck!?

 

Any suggestions anyone?

 

 

 

Vincent 2012 June 24

Well I decided to put them in the oven with the light on, which turned out to be a bit of a mistake. The oven got much hotter this way than I expected and the dough over proved slightly. Still I baked it anyway and despite the lack of oven spring the bread tasted delicious and the crumb was pretty darn good - as you can see from the photo's.

 

On a slightly more somber note I think I might have ruined my new and only proving baskets when the dough stuck to the bottom. I tried rubing in a load more flour and scrapping the bottom of the baskets but to my frustration the dough for the cinnamon swirls I'm making also stuck!?

 

Any suggestions anyone?

 

 

 

shasta's picture
shasta 2012 July 16

When I use my oven during proofing I prop the door open a inch or two to regulate the heat. That keeps things from getting too hot.

 

I think your loaves look great!

RobCollier 2012 July 19

Rice flour is what I'd recommend for dusting banettons, Vincent.

From a health store or a supermarket 'gluten-free flour' is usually just rice flour.

I've never had a sticking dough since I started using it, even with high-hydrations at 75%.

 

What part of Waterworld, previously known as the UK are you? Can't be worse than the Calder Valley where I am

Vincent 2012 July 25

Hey Rob,

 

Thanks for the tip, i'm sure i've got some rice flour left over from my japanese phase, I'll be sure to try it. I'm not far from you in leeds. Did you get flooded?

 

at least the sun is shining now!

gongoozler 2012 July 25

 I can confrim Rob's comments about rice flour, I, too, find it brilliant as a release agent.

My own tip would be to get yourseolf one of those spray cans of oil and give the inside of the banneton a very light coating before sprinkling on the rice flour, this helps it to stick to the sides rather than collect in the bottom.

I have a separate dredger with very fine holes which I reserve for the rice flour. This makes it easier to get a nice, even distribution.

Good luck!

Gongoozler

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